12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (2024)

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By

Shelby Vittek

12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (1)

Shelby Vittek

Shelby Vittek has written about home organization, food, farming, and travel for 12 years. Her work has appeared in Food & Wine, The Kitchn, National Geographic, and more.

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Updated on 10/11/23

Reviewed by

Andrew Hughes

12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (2)

Reviewed byAndrew Hughes

Andrew Hughes is a certified arborist, member of the International Society of Arborists specializing in tree heal care, and reviews tree content on The Spruce's Gardening Review Board. He founded and runs Urban Loggers, LLC, a company offering residential tree services in the Midwest and Connecticut.

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There are more than 3,000 types of pear trees in the world, but only a fraction of those are grown in the United States. That makes deciding which pear tree to plant in your yard easier. However, there are a few criteria to consider first.

Finding the best pear tree variety for your climate is crucial. Some are better suited for colder environments, while others can thrive in warmer climates. All pear trees require a certain number of "chill hours" every year, which refers to the total number of hours between 32 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit an area receives on average each winter. If you want your pear tree to produce fruit reliably, research the number of chill hours your area receives.

Here are 12 types of pear trees suitable to be grown in your yard.

  • 01 of 12

    Bartlett

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (4)

    Bartlett pears (also known as Williams pears) are the most popular commercial variety grown in the United States. They have a perfect pear shape and are crisp and aromatic. The Bartlett pear tree produces fragrant white flowers in the spring. They are self-pollinating but not drought-tolerant.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-7
    • Mature Size: 20 ft. tall, 20 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, slightly acidic
    • Chill hours:800
  • 02 of 12

    Baldwin

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (5)

    The Baldwin pear is a hybrid crossing between a European pear and an Asian pear tree. It produces fruits that are semi-hard and sweet, making them great for canning or desserts. Compared to other pear varieties, Baldwin requires fewer chill hours, making it a great choice for planting in warmer, southern regions.

    To produce fruit, Baldwin pear trees require the presence of another variety of pear tree for cross-pollination. Good companion pears include Hood, Kieffer, or Bartlett.

    • Species: Hybrid (Pyrus communis x Pyrus pyrifolia)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-9
    • Mature Size: 20-30 ft. tall, 10-20 ft. wide
    • Light: Partial to full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, sandy, clay, or loam
    • Chill hours:150
  • 03 of 12

    Kieffer

    The Kieffer pear tree is named after the farm of Peter Kieffer in colonial Philadelphia, where it originated. It's believed to have started from an accidental crossing and is now one of the most widely planted pears in the South.

    Kieffer is a fast-growing hardy pear tree that tolerates heat, and is disease-resistant. The large, long, golden yellow fruit it produces is good for canning, baking, and making preserves. It will self-pollinate but provides a more abundant crop when planted in multiples.

    • Species: Hybrid (Pyrus communis x Pyrus pyrifolia)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:4-9
    • Mature Size: 12-20 ft. tall, 10-20 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, acidic
    • Chill hours:350-400
  • 04 of 12

    Hood

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (6)

    It takes four to seven years for a Hood pear tree to bear fruit, but once it does, you'll be rewarded with a bounty of greenish-yellow pears that are crisp, sweet, and great for eating fresh or canning. Hood pear trees are a great option for planting in warmer climates, as they have low chill hour requirements.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:7-9
    • Mature Size: 15-20 ft. tall, 12-15 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, moist, sandy
    • Chill hours:100-200

    Continue to 5 of 12 below

  • 05 of 12

    Pineapple

    The Pineapple pear tree lives up to its name, producing large yellow pears that have a distinctive pineapple taste. These pears are good for eating, baking, and canning. It is self-pollinating and resistant to fire blight, a common and destructive disease that affects apple, pear, and quince trees.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:4-9
    • Mature Size: 15-20 ft. tall, 12-15 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, acidic, loamy
    • Chill hours:150
  • 06 of 12

    Summercrisp

    This cold-hardy pear tree variety was developed by the University of Minnesota and released in the 1980s. True to its name, the Summercrisp pear tree produces crisp fruit with a blush of red that are ripe and ready for a late-summer harvest. The fruit is best consumed fresh.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:4-8
    • Mature Size: 18-25 ft. tall, 10-15 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained
    • Chill hours:700-800
  • 07 of 12

    Moonglow

    The Moonglow pear tree, introduced in 1960, originates from Maryland. It produces big, bold, red-hued fruit—and plenty of them. The texture of Moonglow pears is soft without being too mushy, similar to Bartlett pears. It's resistant to fire blight.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-8
    • Mature Size: 18-20 ft. tall, 12-13 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, moist, loam
    • Chill hours:500
  • 08 of 12

    Shinko

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (7)

    Shinko Asian pear trees produce large fruits with brownish-green skin. They look more like an apple than a pear. These pears are rich, sweet, crunchy, and juicy. Unlike European pears, Asian pears can ripen on the tree. But it requires you to plant a different variety of Asian pear to act as a pollinator.

    • Species: Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolio)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-9
    • Mature Size: 12-19 ft. tall, 6-8 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained
    • Chill hours:450-500

    Continue to 9 of 12 below

  • 09 of 12

    Shinseiki

    It only takes Shinseiki Asian pear trees a year to fruit for the first time, and one that's five to seven years old can yield an annual harvest of 500 or more fruits. These pears are medium-sized and round, with thin, yellow skin and a sweet flavor.

    While Shinseiki pear trees can tolerate cold winters, they thrive best in areas that don't experience temperatures below 10 degrees Fahrenheit. The Shinseiki pear tree is self-fertile, meaning you only need to plant one to enjoy years of fruits.

    • Species: Asian pear (Pyrus pyrifolio)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-9
    • Mature Size: 10-12 ft. tall, 12-15 ft. wide
    • Light: Partial to full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained
    • Chill hours:250-450
  • 10 of 12

    Flordahome

    This Florida-friendly pear tree (hence its name) produces large, semi-heard pears that are green, sweet, and slightly tart. Flordahome pear trees are resistant to fire blight and leaf spot. They thrive in warmer climates.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:7-9
    • Mature Size: 15-20 ft. tall, 12-15 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained
    • Chill hours:150-250
  • 11 of 12

    Seckel

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (8)

    The Seckel pear tree dates back to the 1700s, when it was first found around the Philadelphia area. It produces small, super-sweet dessert pears that are often used in baking and canning.

    The tree is resistant to fire blight and requires another variety of pear tree for cross-pollination. Good companion pears include the Moonglow and Shinko.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-8
    • Mature Size: 18-20 ft. tall, 12-13 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, loamy
    • Chill hours:500-800
  • 12 of 12

    Comice

    12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (9)

    This hardy, dependable pear tree grows well across the United States. Comice pears are light green with a patch of crimson on one side. These sweet, creamy pears are often referred to as Christmas pears because they are frequently included in holiday gift baskets.

    • Species: European pear (Pyrus communis)
    • USDA Hardiness Zones:5-9
    • Mature Size: 12-18 ft. tall, 12-18 ft. wide
    • Light: Full sun
    • Soil: Well-drained, loamy
    • Chill hours:500-600

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12 Types of Pear Trees to Grow in Your Yard (2024)
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